CL 122 / Critical Approaches to Literature II

arrow-to-right3.png(If you want to read entries on specific critical approaches, just click on an item in Signs or Signifiers; then click on the header to return to this page.)

Description

CL 122 (Comparative Literature 122) or “Critical Approaches to Literature II” is a three-unit course that involves the study of literary theory and criticism from the late nineteenth century to the present. It is specially designed to enrich the critical knowledge of Creative Writing students.

Objectives

By the end of the semester students must have a comprehensive knowledge of contemporary literary theory and criticism; and they must be able to apply these critical principles, concepts, and methods and techniques in critiquing and in writing creative works. Specifically, students must be able to:

  • Articulate during class discussions the critical principles, concepts, and methods and techniques involved in literary and cultural production
  • Demonstrate skills in analyzing various literary and cultural texts in writing exercises, assignments, and examinations
  • Apply these critical principles, concepts, and methods and techniques in writing creative works

Instructional format

Students will be assigned readings (critical, literary, and cultural texts) prior to class discussions, exercises, writing assignments, and examinations. Students are expected to have read these assignments and to be ready to participate in class discussions and other activities. On several occasions, class discussions may give way to exercises and/or examinations. After every unit, students may be asked to submit critical analyses on a literary or cultural text using the critical principles, concepts, and methods and techniques under study; or they may be asked to submit an alternative assignment that will allow them to demonstrate their application of critical principles and concepts in writing creative works.

References

  • Chandler, Daniel. Semiotics for Beginners. 1994. Online: http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/S4B/semiotic.html [Henceforth referred to as SFB.]
  • Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1983. [Henceforth referred to as LTAI.]
  • Green, Keith, and Jill LeBihan. Critical Theory and Practice: A Coursebook. London: Routledge, 1996. [Henceforth referred to as CTAPAC.]
  • Knowles, James. “Marxism, New Historicism and Cultural Materialism.” Introducing Literary Studies. Ed. Richard Bradford. New York: PrenticeHall/Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1996.
  • Rivkin, Julie, and Michael Ryan (Eds.). Literary Theory: An Anthology. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1998. [Henceforth referred to as LTAA.]

Attendance/class participation

Students may refer to the university’s Student Manual regarding policies on absences and their corresponding penalties. However, attendance also means active participation in classroom discussions and activities. As such, students are expected to take responsibility in examining, exploring, critiquing, and challenging ideas, concepts, and methods and techniques. They are also expected to have completed reading assignments before the scheduled discussion session.

Requirements

Aside from active participation in class discussions, students will write individual critical analyses, using literary and critical theories, of Philippine (with emphasis on writings of Mindanaon or Mindanao-based writers) literary or cultural texts as part of their requirements. They may submit an alternative assignment that will allow them to demonstrate their application of critical principles and concepts in writing creative works. Students will also take occasional quizzes and the midterm and final examinations.

Late submissions

Grades of papers submitted beyond the deadline may be deducted points for each calendar day the paper is late. No make-up test will be given for short quizzes since topics covered will be discussed during class sessions.

Plagiarism

Students commit plagiarism when they present as their own someone else’s work or ideas. Such action may result in a failing mark or possible expulsion from the university.

Grades

Grades for every group and/or individual activity will be computed using the following formula –

Student’s score (50) / highest possible score + 50 = Grade

To arrive at a particular rating, students may get their individual raw score and multiply it by 50 (the transmutation base). They then divide the product by the highest possible score, and add 50 to the quotient.

The grade arrived at is equivalent to the University’s rating scale: a grade of 0-70 is equivalent to a 5.0 (Failure); 71-73 is equivalent to 4.0 (Conditional Failure); 74-76 is equivalent to 3.0 (Passing); 77-79 is equivalent to 2.75; 80-82 is equivalent to 2.5 (Satisfactory); 83-85 is equivalent to 2.25; 86-88 is equivalent to 2.0 (Good); 89-91 is equivalent to 1.75; 92-94 is equivalent to 1.5 (Very Good); 95-97 is equivalent to 1.25; and 98-100 is equivalent to 1.0 (Excellent).

A student’s rating for participation in class activities, short quizzes/exercises, and examinations will then be computed according to its corresponding percentage of the final grade: class participation, short quizzes/exercises (30%); midterm and final exams (30%), and the individual analysis/alternative assignment (40%).

Topics

After an orientation to the course, students will read the following assigned materials in preparation for class discussions and application activities on the following:

Day 1: Orientation to the course

Day 2: Literature and the linguistic turn

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Language, Linguistics and Literature” (CTAPAC, pp. 1-17)

Day 3: Literature and the linguistic turn – continued

  • Cleanth Brooks’s “The Formalist Critics” (LTAA, pp. 52-57)
  • Cleanth Brooks’s “The Language of Paradox” (LTAA, pp. 58-70)

Day 4: Literature and the linguistic turn – continued

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Language, Linguistics and Literature” (CTAPAC, pp. 18-43)
  • Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan’s “Formalisms” (LTAA, pp. 3-7)
  • Boris Eichenbaum’s “Introduction to the Formal Method” (LTAA, pp. 8-16)

Day 5: Literature and the linguistic turn – continued

  • Viktor Shklovsky’s “Art as Technique” (LTAA, pp. 17-23)
  • Boris Tomashevsky’s “Thematics” (LTAA, pp. 24-27)

Day 6: Literature and the linguistic turn – continued

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Language, Linguistics and Literature” (CTAPAC, pp. 18-43)
  • J. L. Austin’s How to Do Things with Words (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 96-100)

Day 7: Literature and the linguistic turn – continued

  • Mikhail Bakhtin’s “Discourse in the Novel” (LTAA, pp. 32-44)
  • Mikhail Bakhtin’s Rabelais and His World (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 45-51)

Days 8-9: Literature and the linguistic turn – continued

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Structures of Literature” (CTAPAC, pp. 49-62)
  • Jonathan Culler’s “The Linguistic Foundation” (LTAA, pp. 73-75)
  • Ferdinand de Saussure’s Course in General Linguistics (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 76-90)
  • Roman Jakobson’s “Two Aspects of Language” (LTAA, pp. 91-95)

Day 10: Literature and the linguistic turn – continued

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Structures of Literature” (CTAPAC, pp. 62-77)
  • Vladimir Propp’s Morphology of the Folktale (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 28-31)
  • Claude Lévi-Strauss’s “The Structural Study of Myth” (LTAA, pp. 101-115)

Days 11-12: Literature and the linguistic turn – continued

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Structures of Literature” (CTAPAC, pp. 77-87)
  • Daniel Chandler’s Semiotics for Beginners

Day 13: Literature and history

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Literature and history” (CTAPAC, pp. 93-111 & 124-134)
  • Terry Eagleton’s “Introduction: What is Literature?” and “The Rise of English” (LTAI, pp. 1-16 and 53)

Day 14: Literature and history – continued

  • Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan’s “‘Starting with Zero: Basic Marxism” (LTAA, pp. 231-242)
  • G. W. F. Hegel’s The Science of Logic (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 243-246)
  • Karl Marx’s Grundrisse, The German Ideology, The Manifesto of the Communist Party, Capital (excerpts), and “Wage Labor and Capital” (LTAA, pp. 247-276)
  • Georg Lukacs’s The Historical Novel (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 290-293)
  • Antonio Gramsci’s “Hegemony” (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 277)

Day 15: Literature and history – continued

  • Walter Benjamin’s “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 282-289)
  • V. N. Volosinov’s Marxism and the Philosophy of Language (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 278-281)

Day 16: Literature and history – continued

  • Louis Althusser’s “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses” (LTAA, pp. 294-304)
  • John Fiske’s “Culture, Ideology, Interpellation” (LTAA, pp. 305-311)
  • Slavoj Zizek’s The Sublime Object of Ideology (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 312-325)

Days 17-18: Literature and history – continued

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Literature and history” (CTAPAC, pp. 116-124)
  • Michel Foucault’s The Order of Things (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 377-384)
  • Michel Foucault’s The Archeology of Knowledge (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 421-428)
  • Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 464-487)
  • Michel Foucault’s The History of Sexuality (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 683-691)

Days 19-20: Literature and history – continued

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Literature and History” (CTAPAC, pp. 111-116)
  • Louis Montrose’s “Professing the Renaissance: The Poetics and Politics of Culture” (LTAA, pp. 777-785)
  • Stephen Greenblatt’s “Invisible Bullets” (LTAA, pp. 786-803)
  • Alan Sinfield’s “Cultural Materialism, Othello, and the Politics of Plausibility” (LTAA, pp. 804-826)
  • Eric Sundquist’s “Melville, Delany, and New World Slavery” (LTAA, pp. 827-848)

Days 21-22: Literature and history – continued

  • Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan’s “The Politics of Culture” (LTAA, pp. 1025-27)
  • Pierre Bourdieu’s Distinction (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 1028-1036)
  • Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno’s “The Culture Industry as Mass Deception” (LTAA, pp. 1037-41)
  • Janice Radway’s Reading the Romance (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 1042-49)
  • Stuart Hall’s “The Rediscovery of ‘Ideology’” (LTAA, pp. 1050-64)
  • Dick Hebdige’s Subculture: The Meaning of Style (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 1065-75)
  • Malcolm McLaren’s “Punk and History” (LTAA, pp. 1076-81)
  • Stuart Ewen’s All-Consuming Images: The Politics of Style in Contemporary Culture (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 1082-86)
  • John Fiske’s Television Culture (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 1087-98)
  • Susan Bordo’s “‘Material Girl’: The Effacements of Postmodern Culture” (LTAA, pp. 1099-1115)

Days 23-24: Literature and subjectivities

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Defining Subjectivity,” “Literature and Psychoanalysis,” “Freudian Psychoanalysis,” and “Sexual Identity and Psychoanalysis” (CTAPAC, pp. 140-161)
  • Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan’s “Introduction: ‘Strangers to Ourselves: Psychoanalysis’” (LTAA, pp. 119-127)
  • Sigmund Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 128-150)
  • Sigmund Freud’s “On Narcissism” (LTAA, pp. 151-153)
  • Sigmund Freud’s “The Uncanny” (LTAA, pp. 154-167)
  • Sigmund Frued’s Beyond the Pleasure Principle (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 168-174)
  • Sigmund Freud’s Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 175-177)
  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Lacanian Psychoanalysis,” “Lacan and Language,” and “A Lacanian Reading” (CTAPAC, pp. 161-177)
  • Jacques Lacan’s “The Mirror Stage as Formative of the Function of the I as Revealed in Psychoanalytic Experience” (LTAA, pp. 178-183)
  • Jacques Lacan’s “‘The Symbolic Order’ (from ‘The Function and Field of Speech and Language in Psychoanalysis’)” (LTAA, pp. 184-189)
  • Jacques Lacan’s “The Instance of the Letter in the Unconscious or Reason since Freud” (LTAA, pp. 190-205)
  • Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s The Anti-Oedipus (excerpt; LTAA, pp. 206-214)

Days 25-26: Literature and identities

Days 27-28: Literature and its readers

  • Keith Green and Jill LeBihan’s “Reading,Writing and Reception” (CTAPAC, pp. 183-225)

Days 29-30: Literature and the question of canon

Days 31-32: Synthesis

***

If you have questions regarding the course, you may see me for consultations at the office of the Department of Humanities, 2/F CHSS Wing, Administration Building, UP in Mindanao, Mintal, Davao City. My consultation hours are from 9:00-11:00 a.m., Mondays to Fridays.

You may contact me at +63 82 293 0084 (loc. 206). You may also call or send me an SMS at +63 928 350 3148.

You may also choose to email me at cl122.litcrit2@yahoo.com or post a comment here (but make sure you add your URL so I may link you up to this site).

I hope you’ll find this blog useful for our class, or for your information needs regarding creative writing, literature, and criticism. Please be warned, however, that I may be rewriting some posts to reflect insights gained from the readings and from discussions in class.

Header image is a detail from Mathis Gothart Grünewald’s “Standtafeln mit vier Heiligen für den Heller-Altar Albrecht Dürers, ehemals in der Dominikanerkirche in Frankfurt am Main, Szene: Hl. Laurentius.” The reproduction is part of a collection of reproductions compiled by The Yorck Project. The compilation copyright is held by The Yorck Project and licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.

One Comment on “CL 122 / Critical Approaches to Literature II”

  1. diana de guzman Says:

    sir.. ko po na receive yung exam..


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: